English  |  正體中文  |  简体中文  |  Items with full text/Total items : 26987/38787
Visitors : 2288703      Online Users : 32
RC Version 4.0 © Powered By DSPACE, MIT. Enhanced by NTU Library IR team.
Scope Adv. Search
LoginUploadHelpAboutAdminister

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ntour.ntou.edu.tw:8080/ir/handle/987654321/52067

Title: 運用讀寫教學及翻轉教室增進英語學習者之摘要寫作能力
A Reading-to-Write and Flipped Classroom Approach to Enhance EFL Students’ Summary Writing
Authors: Pramekardo Siambaton
凱多
Contributors: NTOU:Institute of Applied English
國立臺灣海洋大學:應用英語研究所
Keywords: 讀寫方法;翻轉教室方法;摘要寫作;學生的感知;EFL
reading-to-write approach;flipped classroom approach;summary writing;students’ perceptions;EFL
Date: 2016
Issue Date: 2019-01-29T02:34:36Z
Abstract: ABSTRACT Integrating the tasks of reading and writing is important in the language classroom. Writing, a productive skill, improves through reading. Students who read on topics about which they will eventually write can expand their ideas, using reading passages as prewriting resources (Hao & Sivell, 2002). Students’ reading comprehension can likewise be enhanced through writing tasks. Summary writing can be used to teach L2 learners reading and writing in tandem. The use of computers can make teaching and learning processes more effective, and students’ language learning can be optimized (Egbert, 2005). Flipped teaching is a good approach that integrates computers and other multimedia: videos, screencasts, and podcasts (Milman, 2012). Through flipped teaching, students can actively engage in learning (Prince, 2004) and interact with the content of materials using their own learning styles (Strayer, 2007). With suitable activity design supported by interactive media, students can learn autonomously and become more motivated to learn (Abeysekera & Dawson, 2015). This study combined read-to-write and flipped teaching to investigate the effects of these approaches on students' summary writing. Twenty-nine Taiwanese college students with intermediate levels of English participated in the study. Four texts adapted from different online resources were provided in interactive instructional videos, which students were expected to watch before class. Students wrote short summaries of each reading article, filled out Background Questionnaires (BQ) and Questionnaires for Read-to-Write using Flipped Classroom Perceptions (RFCP), and attended semi-structured interviews. All of the students’ summary writings were analyzed based on Jacobs, Zinkgraf, Wormuth, Hartfield, and Hughey’s (1981) framework in the areas of content, organization, vocabulary, language use, and mechanics. In particular, their summarization progress was analyzed by comparing initial and final summary writings according to paired sample t-tests. The results showed that read-to-write and flipped classroom approaches had significant effects on students’ summarization performance. Twenty four out of 29 students showed improvement in their fourth summary writing compared with the first summary. In addition, the majority of students perceived that the use of interactive videos and movie trailers in flipped teaching motivated them to learn autonomously. Furthermore, students viewed read-to-write and flipped classroom approaches with interactive activities as helpful in stimulating background knowledge, reviewing, and imparting content more clearly. Students felt they could better summarize the articles presented to them. Findings in the study have pedagogical implications. First, the study provides insights into how the combination of read-to-write and flipped teaching can help students enhance summary writing. Second, the study indicates that interactive media can motivate students to learn and improve their learning performance. Third, the study suggests that teachers should design interactive reading and writing activities to help students apply different language skills in the aim of better understanding reading passages. Fourth, teachers should raise students’ awareness of text genres in order to assist students become familiar with text structures. Keywords: reading-to-write approach, flipped classroom approach, summary writing, students’ perceptions, EFL
ABSTRACT Integrating the tasks of reading and writing is important in the language classroom. Writing, a productive skill, improves through reading. Students who read on topics about which they will eventually write can expand their ideas, using reading passages as prewriting resources (Hao & Sivell, 2002). Students’ reading comprehension can likewise be enhanced through writing tasks. Summary writing can be used to teach L2 learners reading and writing in tandem. The use of computers can make teaching and learning processes more effective, and students’ language learning can be optimized (Egbert, 2005). Flipped teaching is a good approach that integrates computers and other multimedia: videos, screencasts, and podcasts (Milman, 2012). Through flipped teaching, students can actively engage in learning (Prince, 2004) and interact with the content of materials using their own learning styles (Strayer, 2007). With suitable activity design supported by interactive media, students can learn autonomously and become more motivated to learn (Abeysekera & Dawson, 2015). This study combined read-to-write and flipped teaching to investigate the effects of these approaches on students' summary writing. Twenty-nine Taiwanese college students with intermediate levels of English participated in the study. Four texts adapted from different online resources were provided in interactive instructional videos, which students were expected to watch before class. Students wrote short summaries of each reading article, filled out Background Questionnaires (BQ) and Questionnaires for Read-to-Write using Flipped Classroom Perceptions (RFCP), and attended semi-structured interviews. All of the students’ summary writings were analyzed based on Jacobs, Zinkgraf, Wormuth, Hartfield, and Hughey’s (1981) framework in the areas of content, organization, vocabulary, language use, and mechanics. In particular, their summarization progress was analyzed by comparing initial and final summary writings according to paired sample t-tests. The results showed that read-to-write and flipped classroom approaches had significant effects on students’ summarization performance. Twenty four out of 29 students showed improvement in their fourth summary writing compared with the first summary. In addition, the majority of students perceived that the use of interactive videos and movie trailers in flipped teaching motivated them to learn autonomously. Furthermore, students viewed read-to-write and flipped classroom approaches with interactive activities as helpful in stimulating background knowledge, reviewing, and imparting content more clearly. Students felt they could better summarize the articles presented to them. Findings in the study have pedagogical implications. First, the study provides insights into how the combination of read-to-write and flipped teaching can help students enhance summary writing. Second, the study indicates that interactive media can motivate students to learn and improve their learning performance. Third, the study suggests that teachers should design interactive reading and writing activities to help students apply different language skills in the aim of better understanding reading passages. Fourth, teachers should raise students’ awareness of text genres in order to assist students become familiar with text structures. Keywords: reading-to-write approach, flipped classroom approach, summary writing, students’ perceptions, EFL
URI: http://ethesys.lib.ntou.edu.tw/cgi-bin/gs32/gsweb.cgi?o=dstdcdr&s=G001039D005.id
http://ntour.ntou.edu.tw:8080/ir/handle/987654321/52067
Appears in Collections:[應用英語研究所] 博碩士論文

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
index.html0KbHTML9View/Open


All items in NTOUR are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved.

 


著作權政策宣告: 本網站之內容為國立臺灣海洋大學所收錄之機構典藏,無償提供學術研究與公眾教育等公益性使用,請合理使用本網站之內容,以尊重著作權人之權益。
網站維護: 海大圖資處 圖書系統組
DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2004  MIT &  Hewlett-Packard  /   Enhanced by   NTU Library IR team Copyright ©   - Feedback