English  |  正體中文  |  简体中文  |  Items with full text/Total items : 26988/38789
Visitors : 2347395      Online Users : 31
RC Version 4.0 © Powered By DSPACE, MIT. Enhanced by NTU Library IR team.
Scope Adv. Search
LoginUploadHelpAboutAdminister

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ntour.ntou.edu.tw:8080/ir/handle/987654321/29239

Title: Effect of culture conditions on antifouling compound production of a sponge-associated fungus
Authors: Lai Hung Yang;Li Miao;On On Lee;Xiancui Li;Hairong Xiong;Ka-Lai Pang;Lilian Vrijmoed;Pei-Yuan Qian
Contributors: NTOU:Institute of Marine Biology
國立臺灣海洋大學:海洋生物研究所
Keywords: Marine natural products;mycelial growth;Balanus amphitrite;acid production;pH;diketopiperazines;exopolysaccharide;temperature;metabolites;morpholog
Date: 2007-04
Issue Date: 2011-10-21T03:04:59Z
Publisher: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
Abstract: Abstract:Microorganisms associated with invertebrate hosts have long been suggested to be a source for bioactive metabolites. In this study, we reported that a sponge-associated fungus, Letendraea helminthicola, produced two antifouling compounds: 3-methyl-N-(2-phenylethyl) butanamide and cyclo(D-Pro-D-Phe). To optimize the production of these antifouling compounds, we then examined the production of compounds under different culture conditions (temperature, salinity, pH, and carbon and nitrogen sources). This fungus grew well and produced more compounds at temperatures between 18 and 30°C; the fungus grew well at 75 parts per thousand (ppt) salinity but produced the highest amount of antifouling compounds at 30 and 45 ppt. The optimal initial pH value for mycelial growth was 5.5 to 6.5, whereas the production of the antifouling compounds was maximized at pH 3.5 and 4.5. Glucose and xylose (as carbon sources) increased the production of antifouling compounds. Yeast extract and peptone (as nitrogen sources) maximized the production of mycelial biomass and antifouling compounds. Our results indicate that culture conditions greatly affect the production of bioactive compounds from mycelial fungal cultures as exemplified by strain L. helminthicola and that the conditions favorable for fungal growth may not be the best conditions for bioactive compound production.Microorganisms associated with invertebrate hosts have long been suggested to be a source for bioactive metabolites. In this study, we reported that a sponge-associated fungus, Letendraea helminthicola, produced two antifouling compounds: 3-methyl-N-(2-phenylethyl) butanamide and cyclo(D-Pro-D-Phe). To optimize the production of these antifouling compounds, we then examined the production of compounds under different culture conditions (temperature, salinity, pH, and carbon and nitrogen sources). This fungus grew well and produced more compounds at temperatures between 18 and 30°C; the fungus grew well at 75 parts per thousand (ppt) salinity but produced the highest amount of antifouling compounds at 30 and 45 ppt. The optimal initial pH value for mycelial growth was 5.5 to 6.5, whereas the production of the antifouling compounds was maximized at pH 3.5 and 4.5. Glucose and xylose (as carbon sources) increased the production of antifouling compounds. Yeast extract and peptone (as nitrogen sources) maximized the production of mycelial biomass and antifouling compounds. Our results indicate that culture conditions greatly affect the production of bioactive compounds from mycelial fungal cultures as exemplified by strain L. helminthicola and that the conditions favorable for fungal growth may not be the best conditions for bioactive compound production.
Relation: 74(6), pp.1221-1231
URI: http://ntour.ntou.edu.tw/handle/987654321/29239
Appears in Collections:[海洋生物研究所] 期刊論文

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
index.html0KbHTML273View/Open


All items in NTOUR are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved.

 


著作權政策宣告: 本網站之內容為國立臺灣海洋大學所收錄之機構典藏,無償提供學術研究與公眾教育等公益性使用,請合理使用本網站之內容,以尊重著作權人之權益。
網站維護: 海大圖資處 圖書系統組
DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2004  MIT &  Hewlett-Packard  /   Enhanced by   NTU Library IR team Copyright ©   - Feedback